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Anna's hummingbird (Calypte anna) physiological response to novel thermal and hypoxic conditions at high elevations

Posted by Douglas douglas@hummingbirdmarket.com on

ABSTRACT Many species have not tracked their thermal niches upslope as predicted by climate change, potentially because higher elevations are associated with abiotic challenges beyond temperature. To better predict whether organisms can continue to move upslope with rising temperatures, we need to understand their physiological performance when subjected to novel high-elevation conditions. Here, we captured Anna's hummingbirds – a species expanding their elevational distribution in concordance with rising temperatures – from across their current elevational distribution and tested their physiological response to novel abiotic conditions. First, at a central aviary within their current elevational range, we measured hovering metabolic rate...

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Hummingbirds in cold weather

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This author seems perplexed but Anna's Hummingbirds are rather common cold weather visitors to feeders  in the Pacific Northwest https://www.spokesman.com/stories/2021/dec/25/unusual-annas-hummingbird-sightings-have-local-bir/ See our info on How to Feed Hummingbirds in Cold Weather

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Hummingbird Sense of Smell

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Ashley Y. Kim · David T. Rankin · Erin E. Wilson Rankin Abstract Hummingbirds utilize visual cues to locate flowers, but little is known about the role olfaction plays in nectar foraging despite observations that hummingbirds avoid resources occupied by certain insects. We investigated the behavioral responses of both wild and captive hummingbirds to olfactory cues of hymenopteran floral visitors, including native wood ants (Formica francoeuri), invasive Argentine ants (Linepithema humile), and European honeybees (Apis mellifera). We demonstrate for the first time that hummingbirds use olfaction to make foraging decisions when presented with insect-derived chemical cues under field and aviary conditions. Both wild and captive hummingbirds avoided...

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“Free” food: nectar bats at hummingbird feeders in southern Arizona

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Theodore H. Fleming,*, Scott Richardson, and Emily H. Scobie University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124, USA (THF) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Arizona Ecological Services Office, 201 North Bonita Avenue, Suite 141, Tucson, AZ 85745, USA (SR) Arizona Game and Fish Department, 5000 W. Carefree Highway, Phoenix, AZ 85086, USA (EHS) * Correspondent: tedfleming@dakotacom.net We report the results of an 11-year (2008–2018) community science project (also known as citizen science) designed to document the use of hummingbird feeders by two species of nectar-feeding bats, the lesser longnosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae) and the Mexican long-tongued bat (Choeronycteris mexicana), in the Tucson area of southern Arizona....

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Male-like ornamentation in female hummingbirds results from social harassment rather than sexual selection

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Jay J. Falk. Michael S. Webster, Dustin R. RubensteinPublished: August 26, 2021 DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2021.07.043 Highlights Female white-necked jacobins are polymorphic—30% have male-like plumage All juveniles have male-like plumage, excluding sexual selection as an explanation Male-like females receive less con- and heterospecific social harassment Thus, male-like ornamentation in females can arise purely through non-sexual means

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